Tag Archives: Jesus

CAESAR’S IMPEACHMENT

The Senate removed Julius Caesar from office on March 15, 44 BC. The Senate conspirators viewed themselves as liberators, believing their fellow Romans would honor them for their deed. Caesar, however, was very popular with the middle and lower classes, who were enraged that senate oligarchs had killed their hero. The Roman Empire descended into civil wars lasting more than a decade. After defeat in battle the Senate leaders, Brutus and Cassius, committed suicide. Caesar’s heir, Octavian, became the first Emperor – the Roman Republic forever lost.

Two American presidents have been impeached (Andrew Johnson and Clinton), and one resigned (Nixon) before the impeachment vote or trial could take place. No American president has been forcefully removed from office by the US Senate.

Some Americans are weary from three-years of impeachment talk, believing that if Trump were removed from office, peace and harmony may be restored. America’s polarization, however, will continue no matter who the president may be. If the Senate voted to remove Trump, this would be the beginning of conflict, just like it was in Rome.

Some also want to impeach and remove Vice-President Pence. The OD Action website states, “Tell Congress: Impeach Trump and Pence now,” posted long before the recent Ukraine controversy. The September 30, 2019 edition of the Washington Post had an article titled: President Pelosi? It could happen. Likewise, Paul Callan has an Oct. 31, 2019 opinion piece for CNN titled: How a Trump impeachment could lead to a Pelosi presidency.  

The American republic has enjoyed two-centuries of peaceful transfer-of-power, from one president to the next. However, we have no idea what would happen in a removal from office by force, particularly if a significant percentage of the electorate views the removal as unconstitutional or unjust. Would the American armed forces divide their loyalty between the Commander-in-Chief and Congress, giving rise to a civil war?

If America descends into political chaos, as a result of impeachment, will our enemies take advantage of this opportunity? Will North Korea invade the South? Will China invade Taiwan? Would Iran attack Israel? Would one of our nuclear foes risk a nuclear attack while we are distracted?

Only fools pursue a course of action that has never been tried and that is highly risky. The 2020 election is only twelve-months away. Why are Democratic leaders in Washington so unwilling to trust the will of the American voter? If voters think Trump is guilty of high crimes, they will not vote for him, and will give Democrats control of the Senate.

Jesus said, “Blessed are the peacemakers.” To that I would also add patience. Wait patiently for the 2020 election and trust the will of the American voter. I hope you are praying for America.

Indie Book Awards. Christian Fiction, Novel, Daniel Molyneux Dan Molyneux, Judas Son of Simon, Moriah Books,

JUDAS SON OF SIMON WINS PRIZE FOR BEST CHRISTIAN FICTION

New Orleans – The Independent Book Publishing Professionals Group (IBPPG) has named the best indie books of 2018. The Next Generation Indie Book Awards are the world’s largest not-for-profit book awards program for independent publishers.

The winners and finalists were honored June 22 at Hotel Monteleone in New Orleans, coinciding with the American Library Association Annual Conference. The awards are judged by leaders of the indie book publishing industry, including many with long careers at major publishing houses. Their love of a great read and experience in the publishing arena identify books deserving a wider audience.

Catherine Goulet, Co-Chair of the 2018 awards proudly said, “Our program has become known as the Sundance of the book publishing world.” Independent book publishing companies are independent of the major conglomerates dominating the book publishing industry. Indies include: small presses, larger independent publishers, university presses, e-book publishers, and self-published authors.

Daniel Molyneux’s historical novel, JUDAS SON OF SIMON (Moriah books) was chosen as the winner of the Christian Fiction category.

It and other works by Molyneux are available from Baker & Taylor, Cokesbury, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, christianbook.com and through your local independent bookseller.

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5881738.Daniel_Molyneux

Indie Book Awards. Christian Fiction, Novel, Daniel Molyneux Dan Molyneux, Judas Son of Simon, Moriah Books,
JUDAS SON OF SIMON, by Daniel Molyneux, Winner 2018 Indie Book Awards for Christian Fiction.

HIDDEN IDENTITY AND XENIA IN JESUS’ HEALING OF BARTIMAEUS by Daniel Molyneux

Introduction

The healing of blind Bar-Timaeus (Βαρ-Τιμαῖος), in Mark 10, may appear to be one of the simplest and least spectacular of Jesus’ miracles, but beneath the surface of this brief periscope is a key reoccurring theme of Jesus’ ministry and Greco-Roman culture. Providing hospitality to travelers/beggars (Xenia – ξενία), and the related concept of gods, angels and/or heroes arriving disguised as travelers or beggars (Theoxenia – θεοξενία), are frequent themes in the Bible (in both the Hebrew and Christian scriptures), as well as in Greco-Roman myth and culture.

Bar-Timaeus may be more than a blind beggar. His “hidden identity” may be that of a Greco-Roman philosopher who has chosen a beggar’s life. And his deepest desire may not be the restoration of physical sight, but obtaining spiritual enlightenment that only Jesus, the Son of David (Υἱὲ Δαυὶδ) can give.

Bar-Timaeus’ healing, in Mark’s gospel, is also a pivotal point for Jesus revealing his “hidden identity,” what some have termed the “messianic secret.” Earlier in his ministry, Jesus instructed those he healed to not “tell this to anyone” (Mark 1:44). When demons begin to announce Jesus’ hidden identity as “Son of God,” Jesus commands them to be silent and “gave them strict orders not to tell others about him” (Mark 3:11-12). Mark 1:34 says, “(Jesus) cast out many demons, but he would not allow the demons to speak because they knew he was the Messiah.” When speaking to the Twelve, Jesus told them, “To you has been given the secret of the kingdom of God. But to those on the outside everything is given in parables” (Mark 4:11). Later, when Jesus asked his closest disciples, “‘Who do you say that I am?’ Peter answered, ‘You are the Messiah.’ Jesus warned them they should tell no one about him” (Mark 8:29-30).

When Jesus encounters Bar-Timaeus, however, Jesus no longer seeks to conceal his “hidden identity.” When Bar-Timaeus calls him “the Son of David,” synonymous with Messiah, Jesus does not command him to be silent; and several hours later, when Jesus nears Jerusalem, he rides into the city in a symbolic manner that proclaims his “hidden identity” to anyone familiar with the scriptural prophesies about the Messiah, the anointed King of Israel.

TO CONTINUE WITH THE ARTICLE, PLEASE GO TO: https://fuller.academia.edu/DanielMolyneux

KIRKUS REVIEW – Judas Son of Simon, by Daniel Molyneux

“The story is most powerful when incorporating details of the time period. Even readers familiar with Judas’ life may not grasp the finer differences among the Sadducees, Pharisees, and Essenes or the threat of revolution apparent at the time. Likewise, information about the intersection of Roman and local powers provides insight into how a figure like Jesus, so seemingly innocuous to the mighty Roman Empire (particularly when compared with the violent Zealots), could be put to death in such a grisly way. Period particulars augment this multilayered portrayal of Judas.”

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/daniel-molyneux/judas-son-simon/

judas-book-cover
Judas Son of Simon, by Daniel Molyneux

San Francisco Review of Books – Judas Son of Simon

San Francisco Review of Books
“As in Daniel’s other novels Judas Son of Simon is history shared and the early stages of Christianity explored in a manner that makes them irresistibly fascinating…Daniel’s gift for storytelling is fully unleashed here as he re-writes stories we have all learned and in doing so makes them so very much more real and tenable. Another very fine book from this young and sophisticated religious historian.”

http://www.sanfranciscoreviewofbooks.com/2017/10/book-review-judas-son-of-simon-by.html

judas-book-cover
Judas Son of Simon,
by Daniel Molyneux

Jesus’ Tomb

This photo is of a first-century Judean tomb, like the one Jesus would have been placedtomb2 in. Notice how low the entrance is, little more than three-feet high; and the large stone to block the entrance. (Part of the outside wall to the tomb has collapsed.)

Matthew 27 says, Joseph (of Arimathea) took the body (Jesus’) and wrapped it in a clean linen cloth and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn in the rock. He then rolled a great stone to the door of the tomb and went away.

If an Israelite family could afford a family tomb, it was a cave hewn out of the rock. A rock bench would be there on which the body was placed. And the body would be wrapped in a shroud, but was otherwise uncovered.

Tombs were visited and watched for three days by family members and friends. On the third day after death, the body was examined.

At this point, the body would be treated by the women of the family with oils and perfumes.

After visiting the tomb on the third day the body was then left for a year, by which time it had decomposed. The bones were then collected and placed in an ossuary, a ‘bone box’.

One of the great archeological finds of recent times was discovery of Caiaphas’ tomb. It was accidently found by a construction workers almost 30 years ago.

Inside the tomb archeologists found several ossuaries (bone boxes). On one of the ossuaries was written in Aramaic, “Caiaphas,” and on another was written, “Joseph Bar Caiaphas.”

We know from the ancient Jewish/Roman historian, Flavius Josephus, that Joseph Bar Caiaphas is the Caiaphas mentioned in the New Testament as the high priest who presided over Jesus’ trial and death.

Inside the ornate bone box marked “Joseph Bar Caiaphas” the bones of a sixty-year-old male and several other family members were placed.

On this day after Good Friday, we have Caiaphas’ bones who rotted inside his tomb; but for Jesus, we have the empty tomb of Easter.

Date of Jesus’ Death

What day and year was Jesus crucified? The following is part of Appendix 1 of my book, Judas Son of Simon.

Luke 3:1-2 provides numerous historical references to the religious and political leaders during John’s and Jesus’ ministries. It says, “in the 15th year of Tiberius Caesars’ reign, when Pontius Pilate was ruler of Judea, Herod (Antipas Bar-Herod) was Tetrarch of Galilee, his brother Philip (Philip Bar-Herod) Tetrarch of Iturea…while Annas and Caiaphas were high priests, the word of God came to John.”

The fifteenth year of Tiberius’ reign – circa 28AD

Pontius Pilate – Prefect of Judea, 26-36AD

Antipas Bar-Herod – Tetrarch of Galilee/Perea 4BC-39AD

Philip Bar-Herod – Tetrarch of Iturea, 4BC-34AD

Joseph Bar-Caiaphas – High Priest, 18-36AD

Annas Bar-Seth – High Priest, 6-15AD. Annas continued as the power behind succeeding High Priests for decades. Caiaphas was his son-in-law, and five of Annas’ sons served as High Priest.

So, from Luke 3 we know that John’s and Jesus’ ministries took place between 26 and 34AD.

Luke 3:23 says, “Jesus was about 30-years old when he began his ministry.” – circa 26-28AD.

John 2:20 says, “It has taken us 46-years to build this temple.” Herod began to rebuild the Temple circa 18-19BC. Therefore, John 2:20 takes place circa 28AD

The Gospel of John records three Passovers during Jesus’ ministry. John the Baptizer and Jesus both appear to have begun their ministries circa 27-28AD. Jesus’ baptism by John likely took place in January of 28AD.

During Pontius Pilate’s term of office as Prefect of Judea, there were only two years when Passover fell on a Sabbath – the years 30 and 32AD. So, Jesus’ crucifixion appears to have occurred on one of these two dates. Given the overall timeline, it is most likely that Jesus was crucified on April 7, 30AD.

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